Home > Press Release > April 12th, 2016

India Switches To Safer Electricity

POSTED ON 12TH APRIL, 2016

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11000 people were either electrocuted or have died in a fire caused by electrical short circuits in India in 2014, with electrical defaults now the largest single cause of building fires.

While improving electrical safety is now an Indian Government priority, poor practices, illegal installations, and undersized or inferior quality wires in buildings means the number of accidents keep rising.

Recently though, the International Copper Association India teamed up with the Central Electricity Authority and the Bureau of Indian Standards to run a full day ‘2nd National Workshop on Electrical Safety - India’ on 12th April 2016 in New Delhi.

Raising industry awareness about electrical safety was the key aim, supported through information on various safety measures and precautions while installing, handling, repairing or working on electrical installations and urging them to follow the revised standards.
At the same time ICA India launched the “Electricity in Building - Good Practice Guide” in collaboration with McGraw Hill India. The book includes successful case studies on good electrical practices as well as the requirements of electrical distribution given the move to smart cities and energy efficiency.

“It is extremely important to give attention to Electrical Safety during any electrical installation as it plays a significant role in energy conversion process across industries,” Mr. Sanjeev Ranjan, Managing Director, ICA India said at the event.
“The Government of India also plans to improve the country’s electrical infrastructure while also adding 88,000 MW power capacity by 2017, a big driver for the power & electrical industry.”

“Nearly 40-50% of the electrical infrastructure needs to be replaced if we wish to cut out Transformation & Distribution losses currently estimated to be around 3-8 %,” Mr. Ranjan said.



You can buy a copy of the book online from: http://www.mheducation.co.in/electricity-in-buildings-good-practice-guide